English Faculty

Paul Battles
Paul Battles

Paul Battles

Professor of English

(812) 866-7208

battles@hanover.edu

Biography:

Professor Battles joined the English department in 1999. He teaches courses in early and medieval literature, linguistics, literary theory, and fantasy and science fiction. His research interests include Old and Middle English poetry, genre, intertextuality, and Germanic myth.

Education:

Ph.D. (1998) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; M.A. (1992) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; B.A. (1990) Vanderbilt University.

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Medieval literature, Classical literature, Linguistics, Old English language and literature, Germanic myth and legend, Literary Theory, Fantasy, Science Fiction

Publications:

“Of Graves, Caves, and Subterranean Dwellings: Eorðscræf and Eorðsele in The Wife's Lament.” Philological Quarterly 73 (1994): 267-86.

This article has been reprinted in: Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism 55, ed. Jelena Krstovic (Detroit: The Gale Group, 2003), pp. 213-221.

“‘The Mark of the Beast’: Rudyard Kipling’s Apocalyptic Vision of Empire.” Studies in Short Fiction 33.2 (1996): 333-44.

The Christian Elements in Beowulf. (Translation of Friedrich Klaeber, “Die christlichen Elemente im Beowulf,” orig. publ. in Anglia 35 and 36.) OEN Subsidia 24. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 1996. 92 pp.

“Chaucer and the Traditions of Dawn-Song.” The Chaucer Review 31 (1997): 317-38.

“Genesis A and the Anglo-Saxon Migration Myth.” Anglo-Saxon England 29 (2000): 45-68.

“Magic and Metafiction in The Franklin’s Tale: Chaucer’s Clerk of Orléans as Double of the Franklin.” In Timothy S. Jones and David A. Sprunger, eds., Marvels, Monsters, and Miracles: Studies in the Medieval and Early Modern Imagination. Studies in Medieval Culture 42. Kalamazoo, MI: Medieval Institute Publications, 2002. 243-66.

“In Folly Ripe, in Reason Rotten: The Flower and the Leaf and the ‘Purgatory of Cruel Beauties.’” Medium Aevum 72 (2003): 238-58.

“Dwarfs in Germanic Literature: Deutsche Mythologie or Grimm’s Myths?” In T. A. Shippey, ed., The Shadow-walkers: Jacob Grimm’s Mythography of the Monstrous. Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies 291. Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. 29-82.

“What is ‘Middle-Earth’? Origin, Evolution, and Mythic Function.” In Andrew Wawn, ed., Constructing Nations, Reconstructing Myth. Turnhout: Brepols, 2007. 319-42.

“Sir Gawain’s bryght and broun Diamonds (SGGK, l. 618).” Notes and Queries 252 (2007): 370-71.

“Building a Better Introduction to Medieval English Literature Course.” Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching 15 (2008): 39-46. (With Dominique Battles.)

“Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Stanzas 32-34.” The Explicator 67 (2008): 22-24.

“Amended Texts, Emended Ladies: Female Agency and the Textual Editing of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.” Forthcoming in The Chaucer Review.

Links:

Uschi Appelt
Uschi Appelt

Uschi Appelt

Director of Study Abroad

(812) 866-7221

appelt@hanover.edu

Education:

M.A. and Ph.D., University of Virginia

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Specializes in early modern literature and culture, Spenser, Milton, women writers, historiography, travel literature, early American texts and colonialism.

Publications:

Co-edited with Barbara Smith, "Write or Be Written: Women and Gender in Early Modern England," 1500-1750 (Ashgate, 2001).
"Ethnographic Economies: the role of cultural comparison in English economic tracts of the early Seventeenth Century."
"Atlantic history: history of the Atlantic system 1580-1830." Ed. Horst Pietschmann (Goettingen, 2002) (p.249-262)
Kathy Barbour
Kathy Barbour

Kathy Barbour

Professor of English

(812) 866-7206

barbour@hanover.edu

Education:

Ph.D., University of South Florida

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Creative Writing, Twentieth-Century Literature

Publications:

"The Swann Who Laid the Golden Egg: A Cautionary Tale of Deconstructionist Cannibalism in Swann." Carol Shields, Narrative Hunger, and the Possibilities of Fiction. Eds. E. Eden & D. Goertz eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003.
"Picnic at Perryville Battlefield," Raritan 27 (2007): 77-78.

"At Red Bird Creek," The Heartland Review 7 (2006): 48.

"The Apotheosis of Jerry Lee Lewis," The Atlanta Review 11 (Fall 2004): 30-31.

"Sight Reading," The Southeast Review 23 (2003-4): 30-33
Dominique Battles
Dominique Battles

Dominique Battles

Professor of English

(812) 866-7086

battlesd@hanover.edu

Biography:

Dominique Battles joined Hanover College in 2000. She regularly teaches courses in Middle English literature, Chaucer and Early literature. When not thinking and writing about heroic literature, she enjoys gardening and knitting.

Education:

Ph.D., English Literature (2001) -- University of Virginia

M.A., Medieval Studies (1987) -- University of York, U.K., Centre for Medieval Studies

B.A., History (1986) -- Boston University

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Teaching Areas: Middle English Literature, Chaucer, Early Literature, medieval romance.

Research interests: the medieval tradition of Thebes, medieval adaptations of classical literature and legend, and the epic tradition.

Publications:

Books:

"Cultural Difference and Material Culture in Middle English Romance: Saxons and Normans" (Routledge, 2013).

"The Medieval Tradition of Thebes: History and Narrative in the OF Roman de Thebes, Boccaccio, Chaucer and Lydgate" (Routledge, 2004).

Articles:

"Re-Conquering England for the English in 'Havelok the Dane,'" The Chaucer Review 47 (2012): 187-205.

"The City of Babylon in the Middle English 'Floris and Blancheflour,'" Anglia: Zeitschrift fur englische Philologie 128 (2010): 75-82.

"Sir Orfeo and English Identity," Studies in Philology 107 (2010): 79-93.

"The Chaucer Seminar: An Alternative to the Long Research Paper," Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching 17 (2010): 101-112.

"The Heroic Voice in Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan," Tristania 25 (2009): 1-24.

"The Literary Source of the minnegrotte in Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan," Neophilologus 93 (2009): 465-469.

"Building a Better Introduction to Medieval Literature Course," co-authored with Paul Battles, Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching 15 (2008): 39-46.

"Boccaccio's Teseida and the Destruction of Troy," Medievalia et Humanistica, New Series 28 (2001): 73-99

"Trojan Elements in the OF Roman de Thebes," Neophilologus 85 (2001): 163-176; reprint forthcoming in Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism (Thompson Publishing).

"Chaucer's Franklin's Tale and Boccaccio's Filocolo Reconsidered," Chaucer Review 34 (1999): 38-59.

"Narrative Duality in Robert the Monk: A Comparison of the Historia Hierosolimitana and the anonymous Gesta Francorum," Romance Languages Annual 5 (1993): 136-41.
Melissa Eden
Melissa Eden

Melissa Eden

Professor of English

(812) 866-7203

edenm@hanover.edu

Education:

Ph.D., University of Virginia

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

18th and 19th Century English Literature, Women's Literature

Publications:

Annotated Contributor, "Studies in Afro-American Literature: An Annual Annotated Bibliography, 1986," Callaloo 10 (1986): 605-655.

"The Subjunctive Mode of One's Self: Carol Shield's Biography of Jane Austen." Carol Shields, Narrative Hunger, and the Possibilities of Fiction. Eds. E. Eden & D. Goertz eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003, 147-171.

"A Parallel, Silent History in Novels: An Interview with Isabel Allende." With Virginia Invernizzi., IRIS: A Journal About Women 19 (Spring/Summer 1988) : 25-29.

"An Interview with Isabel Allende." With Virginia Invernizzi, Letras Femeninas 15 (Fall 1989): 119-125.

"The Subjunctive Mode of One's Self: Carol Shield's Biography of Jane Austen." Carol Shields, Narrative Hunger, and the Possibilities of Fiction. Eds. E. Eden & D. Goertz eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003, 147-171.
Dee Goertz
Dee Goertz

Dee Goertz

Professor of English

(812) 866-7214

goertz@hanover.edu

Education:

Ph.D., University of Kentucky
B.A., Centre College

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Twentieth-Century Literature

Publications:

Books:

Co-edited with E. Eden, Carol Shields, Narrative Hunger, and the Possibilities of Fiction. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003.

Contributions to Books:

"Treading the Maze of Larry's Party." Carol Shields, Narrative Hunger, and the Possibilities of Fiction. Eds. E. Eden & D. Goertz eds. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2003, 230-254.

Articles:

"Anny Annas in Finnegan's Wake? Manny!" In The Anna Book: Searching for Ann in Literary History. Ed. Mickey Pearlman. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992, 123-30.

"To Pose or Not to Pose: The Interplay of Object and Subject in the Works of Angela Carter." In British Women Writing Fiction. Ed. Abby H.P. Werlock. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2000, 213-28
Steve Jobe
Steve Jobe

Steve Jobe

Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of Faculty

(812) 866-7005

jobe@hanover.edu

Education:

B.A. (English), Sewanee: The University of the South
M.A., Ph.D. (English), UNC-Chapel Hill

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

My academic specialization is in 19th-Century American Literature.
The majority of my published and presented work has focused on the Anglo-American novelist Henry James (1843-1916).
Ancillary interests include Southern literature, the short story and literary non-fiction.
Ken Prince
Ken Prince

Ken Prince '80

Registrar /Assistant Professor of English and Theatre

(812) 866-7051

princek@hanover.edu

Biography:

Evaluates transfer credits (for new students to Hanover with previous college-level work; for current Hanover students taking summer courses elsewhere; for international students with A-level and other international credit); supports students on academic probation or with learning disabilities; provides final-stage approval for off-campus studies applications and evaluates academic credits from those programs; approves incomplete grades in courses, discretionary withdrawals from courses, and withdrawal from Hanover; Assistant Professor of English and Theatre.

Education:

B.A., Hanover College
M.A., Indiana University
Ph.D., University of Kentucky

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Specializes in American literature, including the Great Depression era, Walt Whitman, literature of the American Renaissance era, and modern drama, including Thornton Wilder. He also cultivates interests in Frank Lloyd Wright and Stephen Sondheim.
Jonathan Smith
Jonathan Smith

Jonathan Smith

Professor of English

(812) 866-7213

smith@hanover.edu

Biography:

Jonathan Smith came to Hanover in 1974, with a doctorate from Indiana University. A specialist in Shakespeare, he has headed Hanover's Shakespeare in England program starting with the 1977 course, taking 18 groups of students to Stratford-upon-Avon to study Shakespeare in conjunction with performances by the Royal Shakespeare Company.

In addition to Shakespeare, Renaissance and Drama courses, he regularly teaches first-year courses in Great Works. Smith has recently been added to the Indiana Historical Society Speakers Bureau list as an expert on the early history of the word "hoosier."

Education:

B.A., Harvard College
Ph.D., Indiana University

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Literature and drama of the English Renaissance
Shakespeare
Shakespeare in England
African American Literature
Great Works

Publications:

"A Midsummer Night's Dream and the Allegory of the Theologians," Christianity and Literature 28 (1979).

"The Denial of the Shepherd," in Roy Battenhouse, ed., Shakespeare's Christian Dimension (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994).

"Not Southern Scorn but Local Pride: The Origin of the Word Hoosier and Indiana's River Culture," Indiana Magazine of History 103 (2007).

"New Findings on the Earliest Written Uses of 'Hoosier,'" Indiana Magazine of History 104 (2008).

"George Keats: The "Money Brother" of John Keats and His Life in Louisville," The Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 106 (2008).

Plays:

"Lads of Eastcheap,"adaptation of Shakespeare, performed in 2004, Hanover College Theatre.
Kay Stokes
Kay Stokes

Kay Stokes

Director of Learning Center / Assistant Professor of English

(812) 866-7215

stokes@hanover.edu

Education:

M.F.A., McNeese State University

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Creative Writing
Margot Tomsen
Margot Tomsen

Margot Tomsen

Professor of English

(812) 866-7219

tomsen@hanover.edu

Education:

B.A., University of Cincinnati
Ph.D., Indiana University

Teaching Areas / Expertise / Specializations:

Specializes in the literature of the 18th and 19th century, as well as women’s literature.

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