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  • 1 - Campus Safety Office
  • 3 - Ogle Center
  • 4 - Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI) Fraternity
  • 5 - Long Administration Building
  • 6 - College House
  • 7 - Brown Memorial Chapel
  • 8 - President's Home
  • 9 - Classic Hall
  • 10 - Hendricks Hall
  • 2 - Business Scholars Program
  • 11 - The Point
  • 12 - Parker Auditorium
  • 13 - Science Center / Goodrich Hall
  • 14 - Science Hall
  • 15 - J. Graham Brown Campus Center
  • 16 - Donner Hall
  • 17 - Ide Hall
  • 18 - Katharine Parker Hall
  • 19 - Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority
  • 20 - Phi Mu Sorority
  • 21 - Alpha Delta Pi Sorority
  • 22 - Chi Omega Sorority
  • 23 - Horner Health and Recreation Center
  • 24 - Collier Arena
  • 25 - Blythe Hall
  • 26 - Newby Hall
  • 27 - Admission and Financial Aid
  • 28 - Academic Computing Center
  • 29 - Crowe Hall
  • 31 - Lynn Hall
  • 30 - Faculty Office Building
  • 32 - Duggan Library
  • 33 - Wiley Hall
  • 34 - Lynn Center for Fine Arts
  • 35 - Jordan House
  • 36 - Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity
  • 37 - File House
  • 38 - Greenwood Suites
  • 39 - Coulter House
  • 40 - Phi Delta Theta Fraternity
  • 41 - Shoebox
  • 42 - YMCA
  • 43 - Culbertson Observatory
  • 44 - Physical Plant / Utility Building
  • A - Soccer Fields
  • B - Baseball Field
  • C - L.S. Ayres Field
  • D - Zeddies Tennis Center
  • E - Intramural Field
  • F - Softball Field
  • G - Varsity Cross Country Course
  • H - Football Tailgating Area
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1. Campus Safety Office

Campus Safety operates around the clock ensuring the safety of students, guests, faculty and staff alike.

The Campus Security Police Department can be reached (812) 866-7175.

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3. Ogle Center

The Ogle Center is a conference area and living environment for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. A student manager lives in the complex and works with the residents on event planning, hall council, roommate mediation, policy enforcement and administrative concerns.

The individual suites house seven men or women in a suite of four bedrooms (three doubles and one single). Two bedrooms have their own bathroom each, while the third double shares a bathroom with the single room. Each suite has a small efficiency kitchen with a compact refrigerator and a sink. A range is not allowed; however, the residents may bring in a microwave. The suite also has a living room with skylights, cable hookup and a provided TV. A washer and dryer are available within each suite. All suites have air-conditioning, as well as limited vending, a conference area and classroom space.

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4. Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI) Fraternity

Established on January 29, 1864, Hanover’s Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI) chapter is one of four national fraternities for men at the College. Founded May 1, 1848, at Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Penn., Hanover built the chapter’s house in 1955. Their major philanthropy is the Red Cross and their national website is: http://www.phigam.org/.

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5. Long Administration Building

Renamed in 1994 after Henry C. Long, a benefactor for the Long Women's College and an Indianapolis business owner who championed women’s education, Long Administration Building was the first of eight buildings to be constructed during President Horner’s presidency.

Long houses the Office of Advancement, the Business Office, the Registrar's Office, the Academic Affairs Office, the President's Office, and the Office of Communications and Marketing.

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6. College House

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7. Brown Memorial Chapel

Alice Brown Duggan and J. Graham Brown of Louisville, Ky., donated funds in memory of their parents to build Brown Memorial Chapel, completed in 1956. Located across the Quad from the Campus Center, the chapel offers small services of worship and private meditation. The chapel is open every day to people of all faiths and stands as a vital reminder of the religious life and heritage of Hanover College. Mary Katherine Orr Morgan '82 created the stained glass window in the front of the Chapel, for her Senior Independent Study for her art major. Today, this window is a distinctive feature and can be viewed from the south side of the chapel.

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8. President's Home

Constructed in 1952, the current President’s Home was a gift to the President from William H. Donner, an alumnus who tragically died just one year after its completion. President Albert G. Parker was the first to inhabit the home in January 1952. In that time span, four presidents of the College have lived there — Parker, Horner, Nichols — and the current President, President Sue DeWine and her husband, Mike.

As an interesting side note, there are 23 windows on the south side of the house alone and they all have a view of the Ohio River. The President’s home has served as a venue for large events, hosting students, faculty, alumni, staff and other guests. During the 2011-2012 academic year, the DeWines entertained more than 2,000 individuals. Some of the events include a reception at Homecoming, student Halloween party, junior class dinner, freshman welcome, holiday party for faculty and staff, reception for parents and graduates at Commencement, and weekly dinners and receptions for visitors. The DeWines have also made available the seven bedrooms to overnight guests such as trustees and other special guests.

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9. Classic Hall

Re-constructed in 1947 after a fire ravaged the original building on December 19, 1941 (just days after the attack on Pearl Harbor) Classic Hall was one of four new buildings constructed in 1947 to surround The Quad near The Point. Despite a decreased enrollment due to the College’s male students going off to war, President Parker and the Board of Trustees decided to proceed with construction. The College completed renovations to the current structure in 2003.

Today Classic houses the Classics, English, History, Philosophy and Medieval-Renaissance departments. It features a computer station, classrooms and professor’s offices. It also houses lecture rooms with multimedia equipment available for use by professors, administrators and student organizations.

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10. Hendricks Hall

Originally built in 1903 as the College’s library, Hendricks Hall is the oldest buildings on Hanover's campus. Hanover named the building after Thomas A. Hendricks, class of 1841, who served as Governor of Indiana, a U.S. Senator and the Vice President of the United States under Grover Cleveland. Commissioned by his widow, Eliza, the building underwent a renovation in 1952 for use as classrooms, offices and a theatre. A thorough renovation occurred again in 2007, completed in the spring of 2008. Today the building houses the Business Scholars Program (BSP) as well as a large conference room.

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2. Business Scholars Program

The Business Scholars Program offers a better approach to business preparation by allowing students to keep their primary major and augmenting it with practical business skills.

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11. The Point

The Point offers a majestic view of the Ohio River and is one of the few locations where you can view three rivers bends at once. The Point marks the beginning and end of a student’s years at Hanover. Before the school year begins, the first year class hikes from the Ohio River to The Point, symbolizing their journey toward graduation, held at this majestic spot. It is a popular and inspirational place to relax and host events.

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12. Parker Auditorium

Completed in 1947 and named after Dr. Albert G. Parker Jr., Hanover’s president from 1929 to 1958, Architect J. Frederick Larson designed Parker Auditorium in addition to eight other buildings on campus. The weathervane at the top of the 120-foot spire that features a pioneer preacher on horseback indicates the building’s origins as the campus chapel and classroom for future ministers.

Parker is now home to Hanover’s Theatre department and many other performances brought to campus by the Community Arts Series. The Auditorium holds 702 people and has one classroom as well as a construction workshop for students to build sets for productions.

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13. Science Center / Goodrich Hall

Built in 2000, in the shape of an ‘H’, the Science Center measures 123,100 sq. ft. It features 14 classrooms, 34 laboratories (including the College’s cadaver lab), six student offices and research rooms, and 24 faculty and staff offices. It houses the Biology, Chemistry, and Physics departments. One of the Science Center’s many distinctive features are the museum-quality exhibits and displays found throughout the building including biological and geological specimens, Native American artifacts, historical documents, vintage laboratory equipment, and a striking ceramic fish wall in the second floor lounge.

Goodrich Hall
Built in 1947 as one of four new buildings surrounding the Quad, Goodrich is now a wing of the Science Center. Named after P.E. Goodrich, a member of the Board of Trustees, this wing of the Science Center houses the Psychology, Geology, Astronomy and Physics departments.

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14. Science Hall

Built in 1952 as a library, Science Hall became an academic building for sciences in 1973. Today it houses the Modern Languages department (German, French and Spanish), the Theological Studies department, the staff for the Triangle (student newspaper) and Revonah (yearbook), and a variety of offices.

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15. J. Graham Brown Campus Center

Philanthropist J. Graham Brown donated the $2,000,000 to build the Campus Center in 1967. Today it houses the dining room, the Underground, the mailroom, health services, the Barnes and Noble bookstore, the Office of Alumni Engagement, and the Withrow Student Activity Center complete with pool tables, media room, craft room, HAQ Center and coffee shop.

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16. Donner Hall

Donner Hall is the residence for first-year women. Centrally located, the building can accommodate up to 80 women. Most of the rooms are doubles, but there are single rooms and a triple available. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, wardrobe and bed. If the room is a triple, it will have three sets of furniture. A double contains two sets and a single has one set. There are two common bathrooms per floor; one for each wing, as well as common floor lounges, an efficiency kitchen and laundry facilities located in the basement. Donner Hall also connects to Ide Hall via the Donner Lecture Hall, used for numerous functions throughout the year.

There are six resident assistants that live and work in Donner Hall, two per floor, one for each wing. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

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17. Ide Hall

Ide Hall is the residence for first-year men, accommodating up to 40 students. Most rooms are doubles, but there are a few single rooms. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, wardrobe and bed. If the room is a double, it will have two sets of furniture; a single contains one set. There are common bathrooms for each wing, as well as common lounges, an efficiency kitchen and laundry facilities. Ide Hall also connects to Donner Hall via the Donner Lecture Hall, used for numerous functions throughout the year.

There are three resident assistants that live and work in Ide Hall, one per floor. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

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18. Katharine Parker Hall

Katharine Parker Hall is the co-ed hall for first-year students, accommodating up to 90 students with men in one wing and women in the other. Most rooms are doubles, but there are a few single rooms available. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser and bed. If the room is a double, it will have two sets of furniture; a single contains one set. There are common bathrooms for each wing, a common lounge and laundry facilities.

There are six resident assistants that live and work in Katharine Parker. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

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19. Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority

Founded in 1870, Kappa Alpha Theta is known as the “first Greek-letter fraternity known among women.” This chapter is one of four national sororities for women at the College. Founded January 20, 1870, at Indiana Asbury (now DePauw University), Hanover built the chapter’s house in 1971. Their major philanthropy is the Court Appointed Special Advocates Group and their national website is: http://www.kappaalphatheta.org/.

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20. Phi Mu Sorority

Founded in 1852, Phi Mu has evolved into one of the strongest women's fraternities in the nation with over 150,000 members. This chapter is one of four national sororities for women at the College. Founded on campus in 1913, Hanover completed the chapter’s house in 1954. Their major philanthropies are the Riley Children's Hospital & Children's Miracle Network and their national website is: http://www.phimu.org/.

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21. Alpha Delta Pi Sorority

Founded in 1851, Alpha Delta Pi’s motto is "we live for each other." This chapter is one of four national sororities for women at the College. Founded on campus in 1913, Hanover completed the chapter’s house in 1954. Their major philanthropy is the Ronald McDonald House and their national website is: http://www.alphadeltapi.org/.

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22. Chi Omega Sorority

Founded in 1895, Chi Omega takes great pride in being the second largest women's organization in the country. This chapter is one of four national sororities for women at the College. Hanover completed the chapter’s house in 1954 for another sorority, Alpha Omicron Pi, and in 1987 Chi Omega was founded here and replaced the AOPi house. Their major philanthropy is the Make-A-Wish Foundation and their national website is: http://www.chiomega.org/upsilonlambda.

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23. Horner Health and Recreation Center

Opened in 1995, and named in honor of Dr. John Horner, Hanover president from 1958-1987 and his wife, Anne, the Horner Center contains instructional facilities for the Department of Exercise Science, practice and competition areas for the College's 16 NCAA Division III varsity sports teams and general recreation and fitness areas.

Collier Arena seats 2,000 spectators for Hanover's varsity basketball and volleyball contests. The arena can seat up to 2,500 for commencement, convocations, concerts, and other community events.

Struck Gymnasium features three basketball courts and accommodates a wide range of activities such as tennis, volleyball and badminton. The space also includes indoor hitting cages for softball, baseball and golf.

Additional facilities include the three-lane Mitchell Running Track, a dance room (equipped with a hard wood floor, sound system and partition, mirrors, bar and white boards for instruction), three racquetball courts, a squash court and a 6,000-square-foot fitness center. The fitness center contains more than 75 pieces of weight-lifting equipment and aerobic exercise machines such as treadmills, stationary bikes, recumbent bikes, elliptical machines and rowing machines.

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24. Collier Arena

Collier Arena seats 2,000 spectators for Hanover's varsity basketball and volleyball contests. The arena can seat up to 2,500 for commencement, convocations, concerts, and other community events.

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25. Blythe Hall

Blythe Hall is a highly coveted residence on campus, housing forty co-ed students. It is mainly used for those students requiring medical accommodations. Most are double rooms, but Blythe also holds a few single rooms. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, bed, and built-in closet. If the room is a designated double, it will have two sets of furniture. Each floor has a common bathroom. The basement also houses a common lounge, laundry facilities and a full kitchen with stove and refrigerator.

There are two Resident Assistants, one female and one male, who live and work in Blythe. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful community in the hall. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but the RAs play a critical role in the planning of events, orchestrating and running of hall meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies. The RAs for Blythe Hall are supervised by the Assistant Director living in Katharine Parker Hall.

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26. Newby Hall

Built in 1939 and designed by architect J. Frederick Larson, Newby Hall is home to the Education department. Named in honor of Arthur C. Newby, a college trustee for 19 years and donor of the funds to construct the building, the building originally served as the College infirmary. Newby houses two classrooms, an Education Library, a Conference Room, and an Education Computer Lab.

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27. Admission and Financial Aid

Students interested in visiting the campus or applying for admission should make the Office of Admission and Financial Assistance one of their first stops on campus. This building was built in 1955 and originally used for faculty and staff housing. It was converted in 1990 to its present use. It houses the Dean of Admission, the Admission staff, the Financial Aid staff and the Student Ambassador Program.

Office hours are Monday - Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. during the school year and Monday - Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the summer. They can be reached at 1-812-866-7021 or 800-213-2178.

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28. Academic Computing Center

Built in 1955, the building originally housed the Education Department and the College Bookstore. Today it houses Hanover’s Information Technology department.

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29. Crowe Hall

Named after John Finley Crowe, the College’s founder, and completed in 1949, this residence hall re-opened in the winter of 2009 after a complete renovation. The hall houses 128 people in a combination of traditional double rooms, singles, and suites. The lobby, open to all students 24 hours a day, features the Green Mountain coffee shop, an environmentally-friendly coffee company based in Vermont.

Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, bed, and wardrobe. If the room is a designated double, it will have two sets of furniture. There are two common bathrooms per floor; one for each wing, as well as common floor lounges, an efficiency kitchen and laundry facilities located in the basement. The suites house anywhere from four to six people and are not co-ed. They are equipped with a desk, chair, bed, dresser, and wardrobe for each person; a common living room with a TV, couch, chair and coffee table; a full bathroom with two showers; and a small efficiency kitchen.

There are resident assistants that live and work in Crowe Hall, two per floor, one for each wing. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

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31. Lynn Hall

Named for Charles and Dorothy Lynn, two of the College’s generous benefactors, and built in 1946, Lynn Hall originally served as a gymnasium and housed the main gym and locker rooms until construction of the Horner Center was complete. Lynn Hall was renovated in 2014 into a hybrid academic and student housing facility. It is also the home of the Career Center and Study Abroad offices.

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30. Faculty Office Building

Built in 1931, the Faculty Office Building was formerly the Phi Delta Theta fraternity house on campus. Today it houses the Sociology, Anthropology, and Economics departments, along with several classrooms. It also features a large meeting area and a full kitchen.

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32. Duggan Library

In addition to providing the funds to build the Campus Center and the Chapel, J. Graham Brown donated the money to build the Agnes Brown Duggan Library in honor of his sister. Constructed in 1973, the library holds more than 225,000 print volumes, 300,000 documents, 50,000 micro texts, 5,000 audiovisual items and numerous electronic resources to support student research. The library houses a student computer lab with 24-hour-a-day access, small conference rooms, college archives, audio/visual carrels, independent study carrels, photocopying and printing rooms.

The Gladish Center for Teaching and Learning provides a wide range of services to its students, faculty, and staff. These include peer tutoring of students at the center, in the classroom, in residence halls, and online services that provide advice, exercises and scholarship.

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33. Wiley Hall

Wiley Hall, renovated in 2010, is one of the co-ed residence halls for upperclassmen, accommodating up to 90 students with men in one wing and women in the other. Most rooms are doubles, but there are a few singles, a couple of triples and one quad room available. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, built-in closet and bed. If the room is a quad, it will have four sets of furniture; a triple contains three sets, a double contains two sets and a single has one set. There are common bathrooms for each wing, as well as common lounges and laundry facilities located in the basement. Wiley is also handicap accessible.

There are six resident assistants that live and work in Wiley Hall. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

Wiley Hall Residents share parking spaces with the Horner Center and Blythe Hall, in the lot behind the building.

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34. Lynn Center for Fine Arts

Built in 1977, Hanover re-dedicated the Center for Fine Arts as The Charles and Dorothy Lynn Center for Fine Arts in 1996. The Lynns, both former members of the Board of Trustees themselves, had special interest in the arts at Hanover College and expressed extraordinary financial support. In 1987, Hanover named the Recital Hall after Mr. and Mrs. Paul Fitzgibbon, friends and benefactors of the College.

Currently, CFA houses the Art, Communications, Mathematics and Music departments. It features an art gallery, recital hall, computer lab, classrooms, lecture halls, instrumental and choral rehearsal areas, art studios, photography labs, faculty offices, a television control room, an audio recording/ broadcast booth, a closed circuit television studio, and an editing suite.

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35. Jordan House

Built in 1955, Jordan House houses Hanover's Sigma Chi Fraternity. Established in 1871, Hanover’s Sigma Chi chapter is one of four national fraternities for men at the College. Founded in 1855 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, their major philanthropy is the Children’s Miracle Network and their national website is: http://www.sigmachi.org/.

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36. Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity

Founded in 1909 and established in 1924 on Hanover's campus, Lambda Chi Alpha is one of four national fraternities on the campus.

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37. File House

File House, built in 1988, gives upperclassmen the opportunity to take on a more deliberate role in their housing and the programmatic aspects of their extra-curricular activities. Theme Houses are assigned based upon a student group's proposed theme. Some themes in the past have been to raise awareness about green initiatives and to promote philanthropies.

File House accommodates 11 residents, has six rooms and two and a half bathrooms, laundry facilities are located in the basement. File House is a theme house and therefore autonomous. Residents are given funds to support their theme in programming throughout the year. The residents have a faculty/staff advisor for their theme and a Hall Director for housing support. It also features a full kitchen.

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38. Greenwood Suites

Built in 2002, Greenwood gives juniors and seniors the chance to a more autonomous lifestyle in the complex. With no resident assistants, they are primarily responsible for enforcing policies and procedures, along with the administrative work for the area. The students who live in Greenwood work with their assistant dean/area assistant to develop and implement events.

The individual suites in Greenwood house six men or women in a suite of three bedrooms. Two bedrooms share a bath, while the third has its own bathroom. Two lower-level suites have roll-in showers to make them handicap-accessible. Each suite has a small efficiency kitchen with a compact refrigerator and a sink. A range is not allowed; however, the residents may bring in a microwave. The suite also has a living room with a cable hookup, wireless capabilities, and a provided TV as well as living room furniture. All suites have air-conditioning, as well as vending and two full laundry facilities onsite.

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39. Coulter House

Built in 2003, and named for Moses Stanley Coulter, the grandson of John Finley Crowe, Hanover’s founder, Coulter House serves as a small, co-ed residence hall and houses approximately 38 students. Most rooms are doubles, but there are a few singles available also. Each room has cable television, Ethernet hookups and wireless capabilities. The rooms have the following furniture for each resident: desk, chair, dresser, wardrobe and bed. If the room is a double, it contains two sets and a single has one set per person. There are common bathrooms for each wing, as well as common lounges and laundry facilities.

There are resident assistants that live and work in Coulter. They are responsible for nurturing and maintaining the development of a tight and respectful house community. Each resident plays a big part in this development, but each R. A. plays a critical role in planning events, orchestrating and running house meetings, listening to and referring residents for additional assistance, and enforcing all College policies.

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40. Phi Delta Theta Fraternity

Hanover’s Phi Delta Theta is one of four national fraternities for men at the College. Founded December 26th, 1848 at Miami University in Oxford OH., Hanover built the chapter’s house in 1955, at which time they moved the Faculty Office Building. Their major philanthropy is the Boys and Girls Club and their national website is: http://www.phideltatheta.org/.

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41. Shoebox

Built in 2004 and named for John ’64 and Donna Shoemaker who donated their time and resources for the project, the Shoebox offers an alternative to the normal dining and social outlets for students and provides students a place to drink on campus in a controlled environment. In addition to being an entirely student-run, campus eatery, The Shoebox plays host to entertainment such as comedians, musicians, movie nights and special events like the NCAA Final Four and the Super Bowl. A student-run board controls The Shoebox, advised by a faculty representative.

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42. YMCA

Constructed in 1883 by students, faculty and citizens, this is the oldest college YMCA building in the world. Originally located next to Jordan House, Hanover re-located the YMCA building to its current location by the athletic fields in 1962 to make way for Wiley Residence Hall.

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43. Culbertson Observatory

The Culbertson Observatory that we see today was constructed in 1992 with generous foundation and alumni contributions and houses a 16-seat classroom. The telescope possesses a maximum magnification of 450x and can see stars as faint as 12th magnitude. It is used for astronomy lab classes and occasionally is open for public viewing on special events. In addition to viewing all of the planets, classes have used the telescope to view nebulae, galaxies, star clusters, and binary stars.

The original observatory dates back to 1889. Unfortunately, the 1974 tornado demolished what was left of the old observatory minus the original refractor type telescope that the College has owned since 1889 and the dome, which was used in the construction of the new observatory.

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44. Physical Plant / Utility Building

Constructed in 1994 in its current location on the northwest corner of campus on Highway 56/62, the Physical Plant contains the Housekeeping, Grounds Staff and Maintenance departments.

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A. Soccer Fields

The irrigated soccer fields are used by Hanover's Division III mens and womens soccer teams.

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B. Baseball Field

The softball and baseball teams play on two of the Midwest's finest fields.

The scenic baseball field has a clay mixture and natural turf infield, a scoreboard, bleacher seating for spectators, restored brick dugouts, and an outfield fence lined with 102 trees.

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C. L.S. Ayres Field

The L.S. Ayres Athletic Complex accommodates facilities for 12 of Hanover's outdoor sports.

The 4,000-seat football field is home to Hanover's football team. The football field features an all-weather synthetic playing surface completed in the summer of 2008. The facility includes an eight-lane, 400-meter all-weather surface with throwing cages and jumping pits for the men's and women's track & field squads as well as concessions for games, bleacher seating for spectators and locker/dressing rooms for the athletes.

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D. Zeddies Tennis Center

Built in 2012, the Zeddies Tennis Center is home to Hanover's men's and women's tennis squads and features eight courts.

https://images.hanover.edu/WWW/campus/map/tennis/
E. Intramural Field

The Hanover College Intramural program gives students a great atmosphere for sports activities. Intramurals gives students the option to compete in a sport they already enjoy or to experience something new. Athletic ability is not necessary to participate in Intramurals, just a desire to have a great time.

https://images.hanover.edu/WWW/campus/map/intramural/Intramural_Fields_1.jpg
F. Softball Field

The softball and baseball teams play on two of the Midwest's finest fields.

The softball field features a crushed red-brick infield and an agrilime warning track in the outfield.

https://images.hanover.edu/WWW/campus/map/softball/Softball_Field_1.jpg
G. Varsity Cross Country Course

Hanover's men's and women's cross country teams compete on a varied-terrain course which covers a portion of Hanover's 650-acre campus. The course has hosted a number of conference and regional championships as well as the 2003 and 2008 NCAA Division III national championships.

https://images.hanover.edu/WWW/campus/map/xcountry/Cross_Country.jpg
H. Football Tailgating Area

Experience Hanover's tailgating before every home game. Both reserved and first-come first-serve spots are available during the football season.